Digestive Health / Gut Microbiota

Impact of a 3-Months Vegetarian Diet on the Gut Microbiota and Immune Repertoire.

The dietary pattern can influence the immune system directly, but may also modulate it indirectly by regulating the gut microbiota. Here, we investigated the effect of a 3-months lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet on the diversity of gut microbiota and the immune system in healthy omnivorous volunteers, using high-throughput sequencing technologies. The short-term vegetarian diet did not have any major effect on the diversity of the immune system and the overall composition of the metagenome.

Relapse Prevention in Ulcerative Colitis by Plant-Based Diet Through Educational Hospitalization: A Single-Group Trial.

CONTEXT: No known published study has focused on a plant-based diet (PBD) in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC).
OBJECTIVE: To investigate relapse prevention in UC after consumption of a PBD during educational hospitalization in Japan.
DESIGN: Prospective study of patients with mild UC or UC in remission who did not need immediate treatment. A PBD and dietary guidance were provided during a two-week hospitalization.

Similarities and differences in gut microbiome composition correlate with dietary patterns of Indian and Chinese adults.

The interaction between diet and gut microbiota, and ultimately their link to health, has turned into the concentration of huge research. However, this relationship still needs to be fully characterized, particularly in case of the Asian population. We compared the fecal bacterial diversity and composition of healthy Indian and Chinese adults, ages 22-35 years, using next-generation sequencing analysis on IlluminaHiSeq 2500 platform. Our analysis revealed unique community structure, dominant Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and underrepresented Bacteroides, of Indian and Chinese gut bacteria.

Risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease: A prospective multi-center study.

INTRODUCTION: Environmental risk factors have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). With rising incidence, it is important to know risk factors associated with IBD in our population. This study was aimed to evaluate risk factors for IBD from western India. METHODS: This was prospective, multi-center case-control study which included 1054 patients with IBD of which 765 (72.5%) were ulcerative colitis (UC) and 289 (27.4%) Crohn's disease (CD). Asymptomatic individuals without a history of any major illness served as controls.

A Vegetarian Diet Is a Major Determinant of Gut Microbiota Composition in Early Pregnancy.

The composition of the gut microbiota can be influenced by dietary composition. In pregnancy, the maternal gut microbiome has associations with maternal and infant metabolic status. There is little known regarding the impact of a vegetarian diet in pregnancy on maternal gut microbiota. This study explored the gut microbiota profile in women who were vegetarian or omnivorous in early gestation. Women were selected from participants in the Study of PRobiotics IN Gestational diabetes (SPRING) randomised controlled trial.

Association between self-reported vegetarian diet and the irritable bowel syndrome in the French NutriNet cohort.

BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in using diet counselling in the management of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Among new emerging diets, vegetarian diets (VD) seem to    be experiencing an important popularity, partly because of their alleged health benefits. A recent study performed among a rural Indian population showed that predominant VD could be associated with IBS. OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study aimed at assessing the association between the VD and IBS, among a large French cohort, the NutriNet-santé study.

Vegetarian diets and gut microbiota: important shifts in markers of metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

Vegetarian diets have been associated with a lower incidence of several chronic diseases. The benefits of plant-based diets are related mainly to the improvement of metabolic parameters that can indicate risk for such diseases. Some metabolic factors, such as oxidative balance, lipid profile, and glucose homeostasis, can be improved directly by diet, but paradoxically, some characteristics of vegetarian diets may promote a negative scenario that increases the risk of certain chronic diseases.

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