Your Online Source for Plant-Based Research Articles

Welcome to plantbasedresearch.org, an online narrative review of peer-reviewed, scientific research papers and educational resources that are relevant to plant-based nutrition. Links to the abstract are included with every article, and links to the free full articles are included when possible! A narrative review is a collection of research papers supporting a particular theory - this website is by no means an exhaustive directory of all research on nutrition and disease but presents the growing body of evidence supporting the theory that whole food, plant-based diets offer the best chance for avoiding chronic disease, and in some cases, reversing it.

To browse scientific papers a variety of topics visit our "Research Articles by Category" page. Please Join Our Newsletter for updates on new studies! Or, do a site search to find information by keyword. Visit the Participate in Research Studies to join the recruitment list for future studies. Thank you for your interest in plant-based nutrition.

 

Fatty acid composition of habitual omnivore and vegetarian diets.

High-fat diets are implicated in the onset of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and obesity. Large intakes of saturated and trans FA, together with low levels of PUFA, particularly long-chain (LC) omega-3 (n-3) PUFA, appear to have the greatest impact on the development of CVD. A high n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio is also considered a marker of elevated risk of CVD, though little accurate data on dietary intake is available. A new Australian food composition database that reports FA in foods to two decimal places was used to assess intakes of FA in four habitual dietary groups.

Statistical model for predicting non-heme iron bioavailability from vegetarian meals

Availability of non-heme iron has been extensively discussed when meals comprise heme as well as non-heme iron, but seldom so for exclusively vegetarian meals. The present study aimed to develop a statistical model for predicting non-heme iron availability from a composite vegetarian meal.

Serum homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12 and total antioxidant status in vegetarian children.

PURPOSE:The results of several studies point to the positive role of vegetarian diets in reducing the risk of diabetes, some cancers and cardiovascular diseases. However, exclusion of animal products in vegetarian diets may affect the cobalamin status and cause an elevation of the plasma homocysteine level. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vegetarian diets on serum concentrations of homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12 and total antioxidant status (TAS) in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS:The study included 32 vegetarians (including 5 vegans), age 2-10 years.

Vegetarian diet and cholesterol and triglycerides levels.

OBJECTIVE:Compare levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) among vegetarians and omnivores. METHODS:Blood samples were collected from 76 individuals--both males and females--separated in four different diet groups: omnivores, lacto-ovo vegetarians, lacto vegetarians, and restricted vegetarians (or vegans). Dosing was done for: TC, LDL, HDL and TG. RESULTS:Significant difference was reported for TC, LDL and TG levels among the samples.

How does the health and well-being of young Australian vegetarian and semi-vegetarian women compare with non-vegetarians?

OBJECTIVE: To compare the sociodemographic characteristics, health status and health service use of vegetarians, semi-vegetarians and non-vegetarians. DESIGN: In cross-sectional data analyses of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in 2000, 9113 women (aged 22-27 years) were defined as non-vegetarians if they reported including red meat in their diet, as semi-vegetarians if they excluded red meat and as vegetarians if they excluded meat, poultry and fish from their diet. RESULTS: The estimated prevalence was 3% and 10% for vegetarian and semi-vegetarian young women.

Pages

Newly Added Studies

             

Subscribe to PlantBasedResearch RSS