Meat Products and Associated Health Outcomes

Dietary methionine restriction regulated energy and protein homeostasis by improving thyroid function in high fat diet mice.

Methionine-restricted diets (MRD) show an integrated series of beneficial health effects, including improving insulin sensitivity, limiting fat deposition, and decreasing oxidative stress, and inflammation responses. We aimed to explore the systemic responses to a MRD in mice fed with a high fat (HFD) and clarify the possible mechanism. Mice were fed with a control diet (0.86% methionine + 4% fat, CON), HFD (0.86% methionine + 20% fat), or MRD (0.17% methionine + 20% fat) for 22 consecutive weeks. HFD-fed mice showed widespread systemic metabolic disorders and thyroid dysfunction.

Unrestricted Paleolithic Diet is Associated with Unfavorable Changes to Blood Lipids in Healthy Subjects

The Paleolithic (Paleo) diet is one modeled after the perceived food consumption of early human ancestors of the Paleolithic Era, consisting of mainly meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, eggs, and nuts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a Paleo diet on blood lipids, including high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and the ratio between TC and HDL (TC/HDL) in a healthy population.

Red meat and processed meat consumption and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis.

High consumption of red meat and processed meat has been associated with increased risk of several chronic diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from prospective studies on red meat and processed meat consumption in relationship to all-cause mortality. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed through May 2013 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. Prospective studies that reported relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for the association of red meat or processed meat consumption with all-cause mortality were eligible.

Worldwide incidence of hip fracture in elderly women: relation to consumption of animal and vegetable foods.

BACKGROUND:
Hip fracture, a major health problem in elderly persons, varies in incidence among the populations of different countries and is directly related to animal protein intake, a finding that suggests that bone integrity is compromised by endogenous acid production consequent to the metabolism of animal proteins. If that is so, vegetable foods might provide a countervailing effect, because they are a rich source of base (bicarbonate) in the form of metabolizable organic anions, which can neutralize protein-derived acid and supply substrate (carbonate) for bone formation.

Intake of fat, meat, and fiber in relation to risk of colon cancer in men.

Some evidence suggests that diets high in animal fat or red meat may increase the risk of colon cancer, whereas high intake of fiber or vegetables may be protective. Frequently, intake of red meat has been a stronger risk factor than total fat. Because data from prospective cohort studies are sparse, we examined fat, meat, fiber, and vegetable intake in relation to risk of colon cancer in a cohort of 47,949 U.S. male health professionals who were free of diagnosed cancer in 1986.

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