Behavior Change / Adherence

The factors associated with the belief that vegetarian diets provide health benefits.

The aim of this paper is to examine the factors associated with the belief that vegetarian diets provide health benefits. A random population mail survey about food choice was conducted among a sample of 1000 South Australians. An additional (non-random) survey of 106 vegetarians and semi-vegetarians was also conducted, giving a total of 707 participants from both samples.

Public views of the benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet.

OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study was to examine consumers' perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. DESIGN:Mail survey that included questions on perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. SETTING:Victoria, Australia. SUBJECTS:Four hundred and fifteen randomly selected Victorian adults. RESULTS:The main perceived barrier to adoption of a plant-based diet was a lack of information about plant-based diets (42% agreement). Sex, age and education differences were present in over a quarter of the barrier items.

Vegetarian nutrition: past, present, future.

Early human food cultures were plant-based. Major religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism have recommended a vegetarian way of life since their conception. The recorded history of vegetarian nutrition started in the sixth century bc by followers of the Orphic mysteries. The Greek philosopher Pythagoras is considered the father of ethical vegetarianism. The Pythagorean way of life was followed by a number of important personalities and influenced vegetarian nutrition until the 19th century. In Europe, vegetarian nutrition more or less disappeared during the Middle Ages.

A model of the dynamics of household vegetarian and vegan rates in the U.K.

Although there are many studies of determinants of vegetarianism and veganism, there have been no previous studies of how their rates in a population jointly change over time. In this paper, we present a flexible model of vegetarian and vegan dietary choices, and derive the joint dynamics of rates of consumption. We fit our model to a pseudo-panel with 23 years of U.K. household data, and find that while vegetarian rates are largely determined by current household characteristics, vegan rates are additionally influenced by their own lagged value.

Web-Based Recruitment and Survey Methodology to Maximize Response Rates from Followers of Popular Diets: the Adhering to Dietary Approaches for Personal Taste (ADAPT) Feasibility Survey.

BACKGROUND: Although there is interest in popular diets such as vegan and vegetarian, Paleo, and other "whole food" diets, existing cohort studies lack data for these subgroups. The use of electronic data capture and Web-based surveys in nutrition research may be valuable for future studies by allowing targeting of specific dietary subgroups.
OBJECTIVE: The aim was to perform a Feasibility Survey (FS) to assess the practicality of Web-based research methods to gather data and to maximize response rates among followers of popular diets.

Web-Based Recruitment and Survey Methodology to Maximize Response Rates from Followers of Popular Diets: the Adhering to Dietary Approaches for Personal Taste (ADAPT) Feasibility Survey.

BACKGROUND: Although there is interest in popular diets such as vegan and vegetarian, Paleo, and other "whole food" diets, existing cohort studies lack data for these subgroups. The use of electronic data capture and Web-based surveys in nutrition research may be valuable for future studies by allowing targeting of specific dietary subgroups.
OBJECTIVE: The aim was to perform a Feasibility Survey (FS) to assess the practicality of Web-based research methods to gather data and to maximize response rates among followers of popular diets.

Recruitment, adherence, and retention of endometrial cancer survivors in a behavioural lifestyle programme: the Diet and Exercise in Uterine Cancer Survivors (DEUS) parallel randomised pilot trial.

OBJECTIVE: Healthy eating and physical activity may help endometrial cancer survivors (ECS) improve their quality of life. However, most ECS do not meet the relevant guidelines. This pilot trial aimed to test the study feasibility procedures for a definitive trial of a behavioural lifestyle programme. DESIGN AND SETTING: This 24-week parallel two-arm randomised pilot trial took place in two hospitals in London, UK (April 2015-June 2016). PARTICIPANTS: Sixty disease-free ECS within 3 years of diagnosis.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Behavior Change / Adherence