Digestive Health / Gut Microbiota

Association between self-reported vegetarian diet and the irritable bowel syndrome in the French NutriNet cohort.

BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in using diet counselling in the management of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Among new emerging diets, vegetarian diets (VD) seem to    be experiencing an important popularity, partly because of their alleged health benefits. A recent study performed among a rural Indian population showed that predominant VD could be associated with IBS. OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study aimed at assessing the association between the VD and IBS, among a large French cohort, the NutriNet-santé study.

Vegetarian diets and gut microbiota: important shifts in markers of metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

Vegetarian diets have been associated with a lower incidence of several chronic diseases. The benefits of plant-based diets are related mainly to the improvement of metabolic parameters that can indicate risk for such diseases. Some metabolic factors, such as oxidative balance, lipid profile, and glucose homeostasis, can be improved directly by diet, but paradoxically, some characteristics of vegetarian diets may promote a negative scenario that increases the risk of certain chronic diseases.

The Health Advantage of a Vegan Diet: Exploring the Gut Microbiota Connection.

This review examines whether there is evidence that a strict vegan diet confers health advantages beyond that of a vegetarian diet or overall healthy eating. Few studies include vegan subjects as a distinct experimental group, yet when vegan diets are directly compared to vegetarian and omnivorous diets, a pattern of protective health benefits emerges.

A comparison of high and low fat meals on postprandial esophageal acid exposure.

Fatty foods have been identified as precipitating factors in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER). A fat meal has also been found to decrease lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) in normal subjects. We used the ambulatory 24-h pH monitor to assess esophageal acid exposure in 10 normal subjects and 10 GER patients following low and high fat meals eaten in two body positions. The meals had nearly identical protein content, volumes, and calories. On successive days, patients ingested one of the meals twice, followed by random assignment to 3 h upright and 3 h recumbent position.

The biodiversity hypothesis and allergic disease: world allergy organization position statement.

Biodiversity loss and climate change secondary to human activities are now being associated with various adverse health effects. However, less attention is being paid to the effects of biodiversity loss on environmental and commensal (indigenous) microbiotas. Metagenomic and other studies of healthy and diseased individuals reveal that reduced biodiversity and alterations in the composition of the gut and skin microbiota are associated with various inflammatory conditions, including asthma, allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), type1 diabetes, and obesity.

Diet and chronic degenerative diseases:perspectives from China

A comprehensive ecologic survey of dietary, life-style, and mortality characteristics of 65 counties in rural China showed that diets are substantially richer in foods of plant origin when compared with diets consumed in the more industrialized, Western societies. Mean intakes of animal protein (about one-tenth of the mean intake in the United States as energy percent), total fat (14.5% of energy), and dietary fiber (33.3 g/d) reflected a substantial preference for foods of plant origin. Mean plasma cholesterol concentration, at a3.23-3.49 mmol/L, corresponds to this dietary life- style.

Fecal hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in vegetarian Seventh-Day Adventists, control subjects, and bowel cancer patients.

Cell-free extracts were prepared from mixed fecal anaerobic bacteria grown from stools of 14 vegetarian Seventh-Day Adventists, 16 omnivorous control subjects, and eight patients recently diagnosed with cancer of the large bowel. Preparations were assayed for NAD- and NADP-dependent 3alpha-, 7alpha- and 12alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases with bile salts and androsterone as substrates (eight substrate-cofactor combinations were tested).

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