Ecologic Study

Meat in Modern Diet, Just as Bad as Sugar, Correlates with Worldwide Obesity: An Ecological Analysis

Background: The public have been educated that sugar intake should be minimized to avoid obesity, but no such recommendation regarding meat exists. We used FAO published comparable sugar and meat availability data to examine if they both contribute to obesity prevalence to the same extent.

Worldwide incidence of hip fracture in elderly women: relation to consumption of animal and vegetable foods.

BACKGROUND:
Hip fracture, a major health problem in elderly persons, varies in incidence among the populations of different countries and is directly related to animal protein intake, a finding that suggests that bone integrity is compromised by endogenous acid production consequent to the metabolism of animal proteins. If that is so, vegetable foods might provide a countervailing effect, because they are a rich source of base (bicarbonate) in the form of metabolizable organic anions, which can neutralize protein-derived acid and supply substrate (carbonate) for bone formation.

Environmental factors and cancer incidence and mortality in different countries, with special reference to dietary practices.

Incidence rates for 27 cancers in 23 countries and mortality rates for 14 cancers in 32 countries have been correlated with a wide range of dietary and other variables. Dietary variables were strongly correlated with several types of cancer, particularly meat consumption with cancer of the colon and fat consumption with cancers of the breast and corpus uteri. The data suggest a possible role for dietary factors in modifying the development of cancer at a number of other sites. The usefulness and limitations of the method are discussed.

Blood pressure, serum lipids, and fatty acids in populations on a lake-fish diet or on a vegetarian diet in Tanzania.

Major risk factors for coronary heart disease were assessed in two populations of Tanzania, one on a fish diet (FD) living along the coast of Lake Nyasa, and the other, mainly on a vegetarian diet (VD), living in a farming area. Lower blood pressure values were found in the FD subjects (n = 618) vs. VD (n = 618) (systolic blood pressure, SBP, 120 +/- 15 vs. 135 +/- 20, P < 0.01; diastolic blood pressure, DBP, 70 +/- 9 vs. 78 +/- 11, P < 0.01, respectively). In an FD subgroup (n = 61), total cholesterol (TC) (122 vs. 136 mg/dL, P < 0.01); triglycerides (TG) (82 vs.

Blood pressure and atherogenic lipoprotein profiles of fish-diet and vegetarian villagers in Tanzania: the Lugalawa study.

BACKGROUND:There is evidence that populations with a high intake of fish, and specifically fish oils, are at reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. To explore the effect of fish intake, we compared two groups of Bantu villagers in Tanzania; one group live on the shores of Lake Nyasa and their diet includes large amounts of freshwater fish; the other group live in the nearby hills and have a vegetarian diet. METHODS:We carried out a cross-sectional study of 622 fish-consuming villagers and 686 vegetarian villagers. 618 (99.4%) and 645 (94.0%), respectively, agreed to take part.

Effects of vegetarian nutrition-A nutrition ecological perspective

Although vegetarian nutrition is a complex issue, the multidimensionality and interrelatedness of its effects are rarely explored. This article aims to demonstrate the complexity of vegetarian nutrition by means of the nutrition ecological modeling technique NutriMod. The integrative qualitative cause-effect model, which is based on scientific literature, provides a comprehensive picture of vegetarian nutrition.

Subscribe to RSS - Ecologic Study