Cross-Sectional

Long-term vegetarian diet and bone mineral density in postmenopausal Taiwanese women.

This study examined bone density among postmenopausal Buddhist nuns and female religious followers of Buddhism in southern Taiwan and related the measurements to subjects characteristics including age, body mass, physical activity, nutrient intake, and vegetarian practice. A total of 258 postmenopausal Taiwanese vegetarian women participated in the study. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) were measured using dual-photon absorptimetry.

Influence of vegetarian and mixed nutrition on selected haematological and biochemical parameters in children.

To evaluate the health and nutritional status of children with two different nutritional habits, the authors examined 26 vegetarians (lacto- and lacto-ovo; an average period of vegetarianism 2.8 years) and 32 individuals on mixed diet (omnivores) in the age range 11-14 years. Vegetarian children had significantly lower erythrocyte number as well as reduced levels of haemoglobin and iron compared to omnivores. The average level of iron did not reach the lower limit of the physiological range and hyposiderinemia was found in 58% of vegetarians vs 9% of omnivores.

A study of serum lipid profile part-1: Establishment of normal reference values of serum lipid levels in healthy vegetarian population of Gujarat.

Fasting samples of 1329 apparently healthy vegetarian Gujarati population were tested for total cholesterol, triglycerides and three major fractions of lipoproteins, i.e. high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins and very low density lipoproteins. All the values showed marked increase with the age. Except for serum triglycerides, values differ in males and females in the age group of above 45 years.

Attitudes towards meat-eating in vegetarian and non-vegetarian teenage girls in England--an ethnographic approach.

This study compared vegetarian and non-vegetarian teenage English girls' attitudes towards meat. A convenience sample of 15 vegetarian (mean age 17.2 years) and 15 non-vegetarian (mean age 17.3 years) girls was recruited from a teenage health clinic. Attitudes towards meat were assessed in a single, tape-recorded, semi-structured interview. Eight themes of the cultural meaning of meat were identified; five were common to both groups: Animal (66% of vegetarians, 33% of non-vegetarians); Taste/Texture/Smell (66%, 60%); Flesh and Blood (86%, 26%); Colour (33%, 20%); Miscellaneous (60%, 46%).

The nutritional health of New Zealand vegetarian and non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists: selected vitamin, mineral and lipid levels.

AIM:To determine whether adult non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists differ in selected nutrition related health aspects from adult vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists. METHODS:One hundred and forty-one Seventh-day Adventist church members responded to a general health questionnaire. Forty-seven sex and age matched subjects (23 non-vegetarians and 24 vegetarians) were selected for further investigation. Blood lipids, serum vitamin B12, folate, haemoglobin and ferritin levels were measured along with stature, weight and blood pressure. A quantitative 7-day diet record was also completed.

Spinal bone mineral density in premenopausal vegetarian and nonvegetarian women: cross-sectional and prospective comparisons.

OBJECTIVE:To compare spinal bone mineral density (BMD) and 1-year BMD change between premenopausal vegetarian and nonvegetarian women. DESIGN:Cross-sectional comparison of spinal BMD at baseline and prospective comparison of a subsample. SETTING:A western Canadian metropolitan area. SUBJECTS/SAMPLES:Healthy vegetarian (n = 15 lacto-ovo-vegetarian, n = 8 vegan) and nonvegetarian (n = 22) women aged 20 to 40 years, with regular menstrual cycles and stable body weight completed baseline measurements.

[Data from an expedition to study a Siberian vegan settlement].

Health status, the way of life and nourishment of 84 vegans in Siberian village (Krasnoyarsk region) were studied and compared with those of 26 meat-eaters. The investigation included work with a questionnaire, clinico-diagnostic and laboratory research. It was shown that a vegetarian diet improves the serum lipid spectrum (cholesterol, LPLD, cholesterol of LPNP, atherogenic coefficient), normalizes weight and cardiovascular system. The vegans had normal levels of vitamin B12 and serum Fe but the calcium level in this group was lowered as compared with the control group.

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