All-Cause Mortality

Healthy Plant-Based Diets Are Associated with Lower Risk of All-Cause Mortality in US Adults.

BACKGROUND: Plant-based diets, often referred to as vegetarian diets, are associated with health benefits. However, the association with mortality is less clear.

OBJECTIVE: We investigated associations between plant-based diet indexes and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in a nationally representative sample of US adults.

Time for change: Benefits of a plant-based diet.

We humans do not need meat. In fact, we are healthier without it, or at least with less of it in our diets. The Adventist Health Studies provide solid evidence that vegan, vegetarian, and low-meat diets are associated with statistically significant increases in quality of life and modest increases in longevity.1 The world that we inhabit would also be healthier without the commercial meat industry.

Vegetarian, vegan diets and multiple health outcomes: a systematic review with meta-analysis of observational studies.

BACKGROUND:Beneficial effects of vegetarian and vegan diets on health outcomes have been supposed in previous studies. OBJECTIVES:Aim of this study was to clarify the association between vegetarian, vegan diets, risk factors for chronic diseases, risk of all-cause mortality, incidence and mortality from cardio-cerebrovascular diseases, total cancer and specific type of cancer (colorectal, breast, prostate and lung), through meta-analysis. METHODS:A comprehensive search of Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, The Cochrane Library and Google Scholar was conducted.

Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies.

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether high milk consumption is associated with mortality and fractures in women and men. DESIGN: Cohort studies. SETTING: Three counties in central Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Two large Swedish cohorts, one with 61 433 women (39-74 years at baseline 1987-90) and one with 45 339 men (45-79 years at baseline 1997), were administered food frequency questionnaires. The women responded to a second food frequency questionnaire in 1997.

Red meat and processed meat consumption and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis.

High consumption of red meat and processed meat has been associated with increased risk of several chronic diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from prospective studies on red meat and processed meat consumption in relationship to all-cause mortality. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed through May 2013 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. Prospective studies that reported relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for the association of red meat or processed meat consumption with all-cause mortality were eligible.

Vegetarian dietary patterns and mortality in adventist health study 2.

IMPORTANCE Some evidence suggests vegetarian dietary patterns may be associated with reduced mortality, but the relationship is not well established. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between vegetarian dietary patterns and mortality. DESIGN Prospective cohort study; mortality analysis by Cox proportional hazards regression, controlling for important demographic and lifestyle confounders. SETTING Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2), a large North American cohort.

A proportionate study of cancer mortality among members of a vegetarian society.

A proportionate study was carried out of the causes of death of the 759 Vegetarian Society members whose deaths were recorded in Society records and whose death certificates could be traced. Compared to the general population, a lower proportion of deaths from respiratory diseases and from lung cancer was noted particularly in long-standing members, consistent with the evidence that vegetarians smoke less than the average.

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