Your Online Source for Plant-Based Research Articles

Welcome to plantbasedresearch.org, an online narrative review of peer-reviewed, scientific research papers and educational resources that are relevant to plant-based nutrition. Links to the abstract are included with every article, and links to the free full articles are included when possible! A narrative review is a collection of research papers supporting a particular theory - this website is by no means an exhaustive directory of all research on nutrition and disease but presents the growing body of evidence supporting the theory that whole food, plant-based diets offer the best chance for avoiding chronic disease, and in some cases, reversing it.

To browse scientific papers a variety of topics visit our "Research Articles by Category" page. Please Join Our Newsletter for updates on new studies! Or, do a site search to find information by keyword. Visit the Participate in Research Studies to join the recruitment list for future studies. Thank you for your interest in plant-based nutrition.

 

A two-year randomized weight loss trial comparing a vegan diet to a more moderate low-fat diet.

OBJECTIVE:The objective was to assess the effect of a low-fat, vegan diet compared with the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) diet on weight loss maintenance at 1 and 2 years. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:Sixty-four overweight, postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to a vegan or NCEP diet for 14 weeks, and 62 women began the study. The study was done in two replications. Participants in the first replication (N = 28) received no follow-up support after the 14 weeks, and those in the second replication (N = 34) were offered group support meetings for 1 year.

Health, ethics and environment: a qualitative study of vegetarian motivations.

This qualitative study explored the motivations of vegetarians by means of online ethnographic research with participants in an international message board. The researcher participated in discussions on the board, gathered responses to questions from 33 participants, and conducted follow-up e-mail interviews with 18 of these participants. Respondents were predominantly from the US, Canada and the UK. Seventy per cent were females, and ages ranged from 14 to 53, with a median of 26 years. Data were analysed using a thematic approach.

A comparison of some of the cardiovascular risk factors in vegetarian and omnivorous Turkish females.

BACKGROUND:Elevated serum total homocysteine (tHcy) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine levels may be influenced by dietary habits. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of a vegetarian diet on some of the cardiovascular risk factors in Turkish females. METHOD:The study was conducted on 26 vegetarian and 26 omnivore females. Serum tHcy, folate, vitamin B(12) and lipids were determined and dietary data were assessed using a 4-day food intake record at two time points.

Serum concentration of biochemical bone turnover markers in vegetarian children.

PURPOSE: In general, most children on well-planned vegetarian diets can achieve normal growth and development. However, elimination of animal products from the diet decreases the intake of some essential nutrients, such as calcium and vitamin D, and may influence bone metabolism. This is especially important in childhood and adolescence, when growth and bone turnover are most intensive. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum concentrations of biochemical bone turnover markers in prepubertal vegetarian children.

Omega-3 fatty acids for nutrition and medicine: considering microalgae oil as a vegetarian source of EPA and DHA.

Long-chain EPA/DHA omega-3 fatty acid supplementation can be co-preventative and co-therapeutic. Current research suggests increasing accumulated long chain omega-3s for health benefits and as natural medicine in several major diseases. But many believe plant omega-3 sources are nutritionally and therapeutically equivalent to the EPA/DHA omega-3 in fish oil. Although healthy, precursor ALA bio-conversion to EPA is inefficient and production of DHA is nearly absent, limiting the protective value of ALA supplementation from flax-oil, for example.

A very-low-fat vegan diet increases intake of protective dietary factors and decreases intake of pathogenic dietary factors.

There is increasing evidence that dietary factors in plant-based diets are important in the prevention of chronic disease. This study examined protective (eg, antioxidant vitamins, carotenoids, and fiber) and pathogenic (eg, saturated fatty acids and cholesterol) dietary factors in a very-low-fat vegan diet. Ninety-three early-stage prostate cancer patients participated in a randomized controlled trial and were assigned to a very-low-fat (10% fat) vegan diet supplemented with soy protein and lifestyle changes or to usual care.

Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be 80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up.

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