Your Online Source for Plant-Based Research Articles

Welcome to plantbasedresearch.org, an online narrative review of peer-reviewed, scientific research papers and educational resources that are relevant to plant-based nutrition. Links to the abstract are included with every article, and links to the free full articles are included when possible! A narrative review is a collection of research papers supporting a particular theory - this website is by no means an exhaustive directory of all research on nutrition and disease but presents the growing body of evidence supporting the theory that whole food, plant-based diets offer the best chance for avoiding chronic disease, and in some cases, reversing it.

To browse scientific papers a variety of topics visit our "Research Articles by Category" page. Please Join Our Newsletter for updates on new studies! Or, do a site search to find information by keyword. Visit the Participate in Research Studies to join the recruitment list for future studies. Thank you for your interest in plant-based nutrition.

 

Alteration of cardiovascular autonomic functions by vegetarian diets in postmenopausal women is related to LDL cholesterol levels.

This study was designed to test the hypothesis that alteration of cardiovascular autonomic functions by vegetarian diets in healthy postmenopausal women is related to lipid metabolism. A total of 70 healthy postmenopausal women not on hormone therapy participated in this study: 35 were vegetarians (mean age 55.0 years) and 35 were omnivores (mean age 55.1 years). Cardiovascular autonomic functions and baroreflex sensitivity were evaluated by specific frequency-domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial blood pressure fluctuation.

Vegetarian diet affects genes of oxidative metabolism and collagen synthesis.

BACKGROUND/AIM:A vegetarian diet is known to prevent a series of diseases but may influence the balance of carbohydrate and fat metabolism as well as collagen synthesis. This study compares expression patterns of relevant genes in oral mucosa of omnivores and vegetarians. METHODS:Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was applied for analysis of mRNA levels from carnitine transporter OCTN2, hepatic CPT1A and nonhepatic CPT1B isoforms of carnitine palmitoyltransferase and collagen (CCOL2A1) in oral mucosa.

Dietary intake and nutritional status of vegetarian and omnivorous preschool children and their parents in Taiwan.

The aim of this study was to assess and compare dietary intake and nutritional status of vegetarian and omnivorous preschool children and their parents. Fifty-six omnivores (28 children and 28 parents) and 42 vegetarians (21 preschool children with 18 lacto-ovo-vegetarians and 3 ovo-vegetarians; 21 parents with 16 lacto-ovo-vegetarians, 2 ovo-vegetarians, 1 lacto-vegetarian, and 2 vegans) were recruited. Anthropometric measurements were taken; body mass index and weight-for-height index (WHI) were calculated. Nutrient intake was recorded using 3-day dietary records.

Metabolic characteristics of breakfast-vegetarian (BV) elderly people in rural Taiwan.

Breakfast-vegetarianism (BV) is a special dietary habit in Chinese society, which is related to religious beliefs rather than health concerns. The purpose of this study was to compare metabolic characteristics of community-living middle-aged and elderly BV and non-vegetarians (NVs) in Taiwan. In 2000, people aged over 40 in I-Lan County were invited for study. In total, 367 people (mean age: 62.0+/-11.2 years, 57.8% female) participated in this study and 68 of them were BV. The BV subjects were less likely to consume oily food (29.4% vs. 43.1%, p=0.025), to smoke (5.9% vs.

A new Japanese vegetarian food guide.

Vegetarianism continues to gain popularity in Japan and the Westernized world, in part from decades of science supporting the health advantages of properly planned vegetarian-based diets. Although there are Asian nutritional tools, one specific to a Japanese vegetarian diet is lacking. Thus, the Japanese vegetarian food guide (JVFG) was developed and based in part on the American Dietetic Association position paper for vegetarian diets and the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top.

Health effects of vegan diets.

Recently, vegetarian diets have experienced an increase in popularity. A vegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content of fiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E, potassium, magnesium, and many phytochemicals and a fat content that is more unsaturated. Compared with other vegetarian diets, vegan diets tend to contain less saturated fat and cholesterol and more dietary fiber. Vegans tend to be thinner, have lower serum cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, reducing their risk of heart disease.

Adopting a plant-based diet minimally increased food costs in WHEL Study.

OBJECTIVE:To assess the cost of adopting a plant-based diet. METHODS:Breast cancer survivors randomized to dietary intervention (n=1109) or comparison (n=1145) group; baseline and 12-month data on diet and grocery costs. RESULTS:At baseline, both groups reported similar food costs and dietary intake. At 12 months, only the intervention group changed their diet (vegetable-fruit: 6.3 to 8.9 serv/d.; fiber: 21.6 to 29.8 g/d; fat: 28.2 to 22.3% of E). The intervention change was associated with a significant increase of $1.22/ person/week (multivariate model, P=0.027).

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