Your Online Source for Plant-Based Research Articles

Welcome to plantbasedresearch.org, an online narrative review of peer-reviewed, scientific research papers and educational resources that are relevant to plant-based nutrition. Links to the abstract are included with every article, and links to the free full articles are included when possible! A narrative review is a collection of research papers supporting a particular theory - this website is by no means an exhaustive directory of all research on nutrition and disease but presents the growing body of evidence supporting the theory that whole food, plant-based diets offer the best chance for avoiding chronic disease, and in some cases, reversing it.

To browse scientific papers a variety of topics visit our "Research Articles by Category" page. Please Join Our Newsletter for updates on new studies! Or, do a site search to find information by keyword. Visit the Participate in Research Studies to join the recruitment list for future studies. Thank you for your interest in plant-based nutrition.

 

Vegetarian diet in the treatment of mild hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

he effect on blood pressure of an ovo-lacto-vegetarian (OLV) diet was assessed in a randomized controlled crossover trial. Fifty-eight mild untreated hypertensive subjects recruited from the Perth Centre for the 1983 National Heart Foundation (NHF) Risk Factor Prevalence Survey were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the first maintained their usual diet throughout 12 weeks; the other two were given an OLV diet for either the first or second 6 weeks of the 12-week trial.

Vegan regimen with reduced medication in the treatment of bronchial asthma.

Thirty-five patients who had suffered from bronchial asthma for an average of 12 yr, all receiving long-term medication, 20 including cortisone, were subject to therapy with vegan food for 1 yr. In almost all cases, medication was withdrawn or drastically reduced. There was a significant decrease in asthma symptoms. Twenty-four patients (69%) fulfilled the treatment. Of these, 71% reported improvement at 4 months and 92% at 1 yr.

Vitamin B-6 status and bioavailability in vegetarian women.

t has been hypothesized that the vitamin B-6 status of vegetarians and nonvegetarians may differ in relation to bioavailability of vitamin B-6. Fasting blood samples and 24-h urine collections were obtained from 13 Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) vegetarian and 16 non-SDA nonvegetarian women aged 50-83 y. The two groups were further subdivided into vitamin users and nonusers. Dietary intake was estimated from a 3-d diet record. Plasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) was measured by an enzymatic method. Vitamin B-6 intakes were similar and provided 85% of the RDA for both groups.

Inhibition of aflatoxin B1-induced gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase positive (GGT+) hepatic preneoplastic foci and tumors by low protein diets: evidence that altered GGT+ foci indicate neoplastic potential.

Previous studies in this laboratory with young Fischer 344 male rats have shown that the post-initiation development of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-inducedgamma-glutamyltranspeptidase positive (GGT+) hepatic foci was markedly inhibited by low protein feeding, even though the energy intake was greater. This dietary effect, however, did not necessarily apply to hepatic tumor development. Thus, the present investigation was undertaken to examine this dietary effect upon the development of hepatic tumors and, is so doing, to determine the correlation of foci development with tumor development.

Dietary intakes of adolescent females consuming vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, and omnivorous diets.

PURPOSE:To determine the energy and nutrient intakes of some omnivorous and vegetarian female adolescents to compare their risk for nutrient inadequacies. METHODS:A convenience sample of 78 lacto-ovo-vegetarians (LOV), 15 semi-vegetarians (SV), and 29 omnivorous (OM) females aged 14-19 years completed three-day weighed records from which mean intakes and major food sources of energy, nutrients, and dietary fiber (as nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP)) were calculated.

A longitudinal study of the growth of matched pairs of vegetarian and omnivorous children, aged 7-11 years, in the north-west of England.

OBJECTIVE:To assess the ability of a meat free diet to support normal growth of children. DESIGN:A one year longitudinal observational case--comparison study of growth. SETTING:Children were recruited mainly through schools from Merseyside and all measurements were taken in their homes. SUBJECTS:Fifty 'free-living' children following meat free diets, aged 7-11 y (expected to be pre-pubertal), were compared with a control group of 50 omnivores matched for age, sex and ethnic group. INTERVENTION:None.

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