Whole is Greater - Vitamin D

Calcium and fructose intake in relation to risk of prostate cancer.

Laboratory and clinical data indicate an antitumor effect of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) on prostate cancer. High calcium intake suppresses formation of 1,25(OH)2D from 25(OH)D, thereby decreasing the 1,25(OH)2D level. Ingestion of fructose reduces plasma phosphate transiently, and hypophosphatemia stimulates 1,25(OH)2D production. We thus conducted a prospective study among 47,781 men of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study free of cancer in 1986 to examine whether calcium and fructose intake influenced risk of prostate cancer.

Antiproliferative action of vitamin D-related compounds and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 accumulation.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:
Vitamin D-related compounds can inhibit cancer cell growth, but the biologic mechanism of this inhibition remains to be determined. We investigated the possibility that these compounds interfere with the activity of insulin-like growth factors. Such activity can be suppressed or otherwise modulated by specific insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins.

A moderately low phosphate intake may provide health benefits analogous to those conferred by UV light - a further advantage of vegan diets.

Although exposure to ultraviolet light is often viewed as pathogenic owing to its role in the genesis of skin cancer and skin aging, there is growing epidemiological evidence that such exposure may decrease risk for a number of more serious cancers, may have a favorable impact on blood pressure and vascular health, and may help to prevent certain autoimmune disorders - in addition to its well-known influence on bone density. Most likely, these health benefits are reflective of improved vitamin D status.

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