Raw Food

Vitamin B12 deficiency due to a strictly vegetarian diet in adolescence.

A 14-year-old white girl suffered from severe neurologic disturbances caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, due to failure to provide vitamin B12 supplementation to a strictly vegetarian diet. The disturbances resolved completely following treatment with vitamin B12. Physicians should be alert to the necessity for vitamin B12 supplementation for strict vegetarians, who eat no meat, fish, eggs, or dairy products.

Carnitine status of lactoovovegetarians and strict vegetarian adults and children.

Because carnitine is contained primarily in meats and dairy products, vegetarian diets provide a model for assessing the impact of prolonged low carnitine intake on carnitine status. Plasma carnitine concentrations and urinary carnitine excretion were measured in adults and children consuming a strict vegetarian, lactoovovegetarian, or mixed diet. In adults plasma carnitine concentration and urinary carnitine excretion of strict vegetarians and lactoovovegetarians were significantly lower than those in the mixed-diet group but were not different from each other.

Attained height of lacto-ovo vegetarian children and adolescents.

The relationship between diet and attained height was studied in children and adolescents in Southern California. Diet pattern was determined from an extensive food frequency questionnaire in 1765 Caucasian children of 7-18 years, attending state schools (452 m and 443 f) and Seventh-day Adventist schools (427 m and 443 f). The major difference in diet pattern between state and Adventist school children was in meat consumption.

Vitamin B-12 status of long-term adherents of a strict uncooked vegan diet ("living food diet") is compromised.

The present study examined the vitamin B-12 status in long-term adherents of a strict uncooked vegan diet called the "living food diet." The study was comprised of two parts. In the cross-sectional part, the data on serum vitamin B-12 concentrations and dietary intakes in 21 (1 male, 20 females) long-term adherents (mean 5.2 y, range 0.7-14) of the "living food diet" were compared with those of 21 omnivorous controls matched for sex, age, social status and residence.

Antioxidant status in long-term adherents to a strict uncooked vegan diet.

Antioxidant status was investigated in 20 Finnish middle-aged female vegans and in one male vegan who were following a strict, uncooked vegan diet ("living food diet"), by means of a dietary survey and biochemical measurements (blood concentrations of vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, and the activities of the zinc/copper-dependent superoxide dismutase and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase). Values were compared with those of omnivores matched for sex, age, social status, and residence.

Faecal microbial flora and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis during a vegan diet.

To clarify the role of the faecal flora in the diet-induced decrease of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) activity, 43 RA patients were randomized into two groups: the test group to receive living food, a form of uncooked vegan diet rich in lactobacilli, and the control group to continue their ordinary omnivorous diets. Based on clinical assessments before, during and after the intervention period, a disease improvement index was constructed for each patient.

Uncooked, lactobacilli-rich, vegan food and rheumatoid arthritis.

We tested the effects of an uncooked vegan diet, rich in lactobacilli, in rheumatoid patients randomized into diet and control groups. The intervention group experienced subjective relief of rheumatic symptoms during intervention. A return to an omnivorous diet aggravated symptoms. Half of the patients experienced adverse effects (nausea, diarrhoea) during the diet and stopped the experiment prematurely. Indicators of rheumatic disease activity did not differ statistically between groups.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Raw Food