Multiple sclerosis - Epidemiology

Multiple sclerosis: the lipid relationship.

Between 1949 and 1984, 150 multiple sclerosis patients consumed low-fat diets. Fats, oils, and protein intakes; disability; and deaths were determined. On daily fat consumption of less than 20.1 g (average 17 g), 31% died and deterioration was slight. Daily intakes of greater than 20 g (average of either 25 or 41 g) were attended by serious disability and deaths of 79% and 81%, respectively. Oil intakes bore an indirect relationship to fat consumption. Treatment early and before severe disability developed improved prognosis, and females tended to do better than males.

Effect of low saturated fat diet in early and late cases of multiple sclerosis.

144 multiple sclerosis patients took a low-fat diet for 34 years. For each of three categories of neurological disability (minimum, moderate, severe) patients who adhered to the prescribed diet (less than or equal to 20 g fat/day) showed significantly less deterioration and much lower death rates than did those who consumed more fat than prescribed (greater than 20 g fat/day).

Multiple sclerosis: fat-oil relationship.

Between 1949 and 1984, 150 patients with multiple sclerosis consumed low-fat diets. Fat, oil, and protein intakes; disability; and deaths were determined. With a daily fat consumption less than 20.1 g/day (av 17 g/day), 31% died, and average deterioration was slight. A daily intake greater than 20 g/day (av 25 or 41 g/day) was attended by serious disability and the deaths of 79 and 81%, respectively. Oil intake bore an indirect relationship to fat consumption.

Multiple sclerosis: decreased relapse rate through dietary supplementation with calcium, magnesium and vitamin D.

A group of young patients having multiple sclerosis was treated with dietary supplements containing calcium, magnesium and vitamin D for a period of one to two years. The experimental design employed self-pairing: the response of each patient was compared with his/her own case history as control. The number of exacerbations observed during the program was less than one half the number expected from case histories. No side effects were apparent. The dietary regimen may offer a new means of controlling the exacerbation rate in MS, at least for younger patients.

Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in Australia. With NSW and SA survey results.

OBJECTIVES: (i) To determine the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in New South Wales and South Australia; (ii) to compare these prevalences with those in other areas of Australia and to determine the relationship between prevalence and latitude; (iii) to examine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of the disease in Australia; and (iv) to ascertain whether there had been a change in the frequency of the disease since 1961.

Regional variation in multiple sclerosis prevalence in Australia and its association with ambient ultraviolet radiation.

The aim of this study was to conduct an ecological analysis of the extent to which ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels might explain the regional variation of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Australia. MS prevalence data for six Australian regions were compared with UVR levels of the largest city in each region, with some other climatic variables and with the melanoma incidence in the same regions. A close association was found between the theoretical MS prevalence predicted from UVR levels and the actual prevalence.

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