Heart Disease and Stroke

Effects of a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet on serum concentrations of cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-C, HDL2-C, HDL3-C, apoprotein-B, and Lp(a).

The effect of intervention with a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet on serum concentrations of cholesterol, triglyceride, total high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), HDL2-C, HDL3-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apoprotein-B, apoprotein-HDL, and Lp(a) was studied in 19 men and 17 women. Most weekday meals were obtained from a single source and dietary records were completed to assess the changes in nutrient intakes. Blood was collected in the 6th wk of each dietary period.

Changes in lipoprotein metabolism during a supplemented fast and an ensuing vegetarian diet period.

The effect on lipoprotein metabolism of a 2-week modified fast and an immediately ensuing 3-week period on a vegetarian diet was studied under metabolic ward conditions in 21 non-obese female and 6 male patients. The very low calorie diet induced reductions of the cholesterol concentration in all serum lipoprotein classes. In the female patients, who were all normolipoproteinaemic, the triglycerides in serum showed a slight increase during the fast, reflecting small changes in very low (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein triglycerides.

Copper and zinc level in biological samples from healthy subjects of vegetarian food habit in reference to community environment.

Many epidemiologists have found a correlation between copper and zinc in the community environment and diseases, such as myocardial and vascular pathologies, and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the total daily intake of these two metals in cooked food, drinking water and air and their respective levels in blood and urine. A chronobiological methodology has been adopted to establish the reference values of these two metals in biological samples. It has been observed that the daily intake of copper is within the recommended value, whereas its urinary excretion is high.

A randomized control trial of a vegetarian diet in the treatment of mild hypertension.

The effect of an ovo-lacto-vegetarian (OLV) diet on blood pressure was assessed in a randomized, controlled, crossover trial in 58 mild untreated hypertensive subjects recruited from the Perth Centre for the 1983 NHF Risk Factor Prevalence Survey. Subjects were randomly allocated to one of three groups; the first maintained their usual diet throughout 12 weeks; the other two were given an OLV diet for either the first or second 6 weeks of the 12-week trial.

Vegetarian diet in the treatment of mild hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

he effect on blood pressure of an ovo-lacto-vegetarian (OLV) diet was assessed in a randomized controlled crossover trial. Fifty-eight mild untreated hypertensive subjects recruited from the Perth Centre for the 1983 National Heart Foundation (NHF) Risk Factor Prevalence Survey were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the first maintained their usual diet throughout 12 weeks; the other two were given an OLV diet for either the first or second 6 weeks of the 12-week trial.

Urinary estrogen profile determination in young Finnish vegetarian and omnivorous women.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a vegetarian diet on human fecal neutral sterol excretion. Free and esterified fecal neutral sterols were analyzed by capillary gas-chromatography in healthy North-American white women who were consuming either a mixed Western diet (n = 19) or a vegetarian diet (n = 20). Vegetarians had lower mean concentrations of bacterial metabolites of cholesterol, coprostanol, and coprostanone, and their relative amounts of esterified neutral sterol metabolism in both populations.

Nutrient intake, blood pressure, serum and urinary prostaglandins and serum thromboxane B2 in a controlled trial with a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet.

Fifty-nine healthy omnivores volunteered for a randomized crossover trial with a lacto-ovo-vegetarian (L-O-V) diet. Twenty-one 1-day diet records were kept throughout the project as a means of assessing food and nutrient intakes, and samples of serum and urine were assayed to evaluate change in prostanoid metabolism. While on the L-O-V diet subjects ate more vegetable protein, wholegrain cereals, polyunsaturated oils, fruits and vegetables, and avoided eating meat, fish or poultry.

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