Heart Disease and Stroke - Dietary Interventions

Dietary interventions with heart disease patients

Arterial compliance, blood pressure, plasma leptin, and plasma lipids in women are improved with weight reduction equally with a meat-based diet and a plant-based diet.

Obesity, strongly associated with the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), is becoming increasingly prevalent. This study was designed to establish first whether systemic arterial compliance (SAC), an index of arterial function, is improved with weight loss and second, whether cardiovascular risk factors that improve with weight loss are reduced equally with lean meat or with an equivalent amount of plant protein in the diet.

[The effect of an antiatherogenic vegetarian diet on the clinico-hemodynamic and biochemical indices in elderly patients with ischemic heart disease].

AIM:To study the effects of newly developed antiatherogenic vegetarian diet enriched with soya bean products on clinico-hemodynamic characteristics of elderly patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). MATERIALS AND METHODS:Clinico-hemodynamic parameters, lipid blood spectrum and plasmic hemostasis were studied in 28 elderly CHD patients divided into groups by dyslipidemia type (IIA, IIB, IV). RESULTS:The antiatherogenic vegetarian diet promoted normalization of central hemodynamics, lowering of blood atherogenic lipids, positive changes in blood rheology.

[Blood lipids and intensity of free radical oxidant processes in elderly patients with ischemic heart disease on antiatherogenic vegetarian diet].

The authors studied the effects of balanced antiatherogenic vegetarian diet enriched with soya bean products on blood lipids and intensity of free radical oxidant processes in elderly patients with ischemic heart disease. 45 patients with dyslipoproteinemia type IIA or IIB were examined for hemodynamic parameters, lipid spectrum and intensity of free radical oxidation.

Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women.

Few controlled trials have studied cholesterol-lowering diets in premenopausal women. None has examined the cholesterol-lowering effect of a low-fat vegetarian diet, which, in other population groups, leads to marked reductions in serum cholesterol concentrations and, in combination with other life-style changes, a regression of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that a low-fat, vegetarian diet significantly reduces serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations in premenopausal women.

[Vegetarian diet in treating elderly patients with ischemic heart disease (clinico-hemodynamic, biochemical, and hemorheological effects)].

The inclusion of balanced antiatherogenis of vegetarian diet in a complex of therapeutical means of the patients of ischemic heart disease in elderly age (average age 72.3 years) promotes normalization of clinical and biochemical parameters, correction of lipid metabolism and parameters plasma hemostasis. Vegetarian antiatherogenis the diet is perspective means in treatment of the patients ischemic heart disease of elderly age.

A preliminary fast may potentiate response to a subsequent low-salt, low-fat vegan diet in the management of hypertension - fasting as a strategy for breaking metabolic vicious cycles.

Although a salted diet appears to be a sine qua non for the development of essential hypertension, low-salt diets often have a modest or even negligible impact on the blood pressure of hypertensives; this suggests that salt, perhaps often acting in concert with other aspects of a modern, rich diet, may set in place certain metabolic vicious cycles that sustain blood pressure elevation even when dietary salt is eliminated.

Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: vegetarian diets.

It is the position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Approximately 2.5% of adults in the United States and 4% of adults in Canada follow vegetarian diets. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat, fish, or fowl. Interest in vegetarianism appears to be increasing, with many restaurants and college foodservices offering vegetarian meals routinely.

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