Diabetes - Type 2

Alcohol consumption and risk of coronary heart disease among men with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

OBJECTIVES:
The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between alcohol intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among men with type 2 diabetes.

BACKGROUND:
Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of CHD. Emerging evidence suggests that moderate alcohol intake is associated with an important reduction in risk of CHD in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Does a vegetarian diet reduce the occurrence of diabetes?

We propose the hypothesis that a vegetarian diet reduces the risk of developing diabetes. Findings that have generated this hypothesis are from a population of 25,698 adult White Seventh-day Adventists identified in 1960. During 21 years of follow-up, the risk of diabetes as an underlying cause of death in Adventists was approximately one-half the risk for all US Whites. Within the male Adventist population, vegetarians had a substantially lower risk than non-vegetarians of diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death.

Toward improved management of NIDDM: A randomized, controlled, pilot intervention using a lowfat, vegetarian diet.

OBJECTIVE:To investigate whether glycemic and lipid control in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) can be significantly improved using a low-fat, vegetarian (vegan) diet in the absence of recommendations regarding exercise or other lifestyle changes. METHODS:Eleven subjects with NIDDM recruited from the Georgetown University Medical Center or the local community were randomly assigned to a low-fat vegan diet (seven subjects) or a conventional low-fat diet (four subjects). Two additional subjects assigned to the control group failed to complete the study.

Favorable impact of a vegan diet with exercise on hemorheology: implications for control of diabetic neuropathy.

A little-noticed clinical report indicates that a low-fat, whole-food vegan diet, coupled with daily walking exercise, leads to rapid remission of neuropathic pain in the majority of type 2 diabetics expressing this complication. Concurrent marked improvements in glycemic control presumably contribute to this benefit, but are unlikely to be solely responsible. Consideration should be given to the possibility that improved blood rheology - decreased blood viscosity and increased blood filterability - plays a prominent role in mediating this effect.

Obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and vegetarian status among Seventh-Day Adventists in Barbados: preliminary results.

A population-based sample of Seventh-Day Adventists was studied to determine the relationship between vegetarian status, body mass index (BMI), obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), and hypertension, in order to gain a better understanding of factors influencing chronic diseases in Barbados. A systematic sampling from a random start technique was used to select participants for the study.

Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.

Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals.

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