Cancer - Epidemiology

Studies that relate to population-based data on cancer prevalance and incidence

Five-year survival rates of melanoma patients treated by diet therapy after the manner of Gerson: a retrospective review.

OBJECTIVE:
Compare 5-year melanoma survival rates to rates in medical literature.

DESIGN:
Retrospective.

SETTING:
Hospital in Tijuana, Mexico.

PATIENTS:
White adult patients (N = 153) with superficial spreading and nodular melanoma, aged 25-72 years.

The effect of vitamin E and beta carotene on the incidence of lung cancer and other cancers in male smokers. The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta Carotene Cancer Prevention Study Group.

BACKGROUND:
Epidemiologic evidence indicates that diets high in carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables, as well as high serum levels of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) and beta carotene, are associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer.

A meta-analysis of studies of dietary fat and breast cancer risk.

There is strong evidence that breast cancer risk is influenced by environmental factors, and animal experiments and human ecological data suggest that increased dietary fat intake increases the incidence of the disease. Epidemiological evidence on the relationship of dietary fat to breast cancer from cohort and case control studies has however been inconsistent. To examine the available evidence we have carried out a meta-analysis to summarise quantitatively the large published literature on dietary fat in the aetiology of breast cancer.

Cohort studies of fat intake and the risk of breast cancer--a pooled analysis.

BACKGROUND:
Experiments in animals, international correlation comparisons, and case-control studies support an association between dietary fatintake and the incidence of breast cancer. Most cohort studies do not corroborate the association, but they have been criticized for involving small numbers of cases, homogeneous fat intake, and measurement errors in estimates of fat intake.

Environmental factors and cancer incidence and mortality in different countries, with special reference to dietary practices.

Incidence rates for 27 cancers in 23 countries and mortality rates for 14 cancers in 32 countries have been correlated with a wide range of dietary and other variables. Dietary variables were strongly correlated with several types of cancer, particularly meat consumption with cancer of the colon and fat consumption with cancers of the breast and corpus uteri. The data suggest a possible role for dietary factors in modifying the development of cancer at a number of other sites. The usefulness and limitations of the method are discussed.

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