Behavior Change / Adherence

The factors associated with the belief that vegetarian diets provide health benefits.

The aim of this paper is to examine the factors associated with the belief that vegetarian diets provide health benefits. A random population mail survey about food choice was conducted among a sample of 1000 South Australians. An additional (non-random) survey of 106 vegetarians and semi-vegetarians was also conducted, giving a total of 707 participants from both samples.

Food-related lifestyle and health attitudes of Dutch vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers.

The aim was to investigate socio-demographic characteristics, and attitudes to food and health of vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers in The Netherlands. The sample used for this study (participants > or =18 years) was taken from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey, 1997/1998. Vegetarians (n = 63) and consumers of meat substitutes (n = 39) had similar socio-demographic profiles: higher education levels, higher social economic status, smaller households, and more urbanised residential areas, compared to meat consumers (n = 4313).

Acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet compares favorably to a step II diet in a randomized, controlled trial.

PURPOSE:This study aimed to assess the acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet, as compared with a more typical fat-modified diet, among overweight and obese adults. METHODS:Through newspaper advertisements, 64 overweight, postmenopausal women were recruited, 59 of whom completed the study. The participants were assigned randomly to a low-fat vegan diet or, for comparison, to a National Cholesterol Education Program Step II (NCEP) diet.

Consumers' readiness to eat a plant-based diet.

OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study was to examine consumers' readiness to change to a plant-based diet. DESIGN:Mail survey that included questions on readiness to change, eating habits and perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. SETTING:Victoria, Australia. SUBJECTS:A total of 415 randomly selected adults. RESULTS:In terms of their readiness to eat a plant-based diet, the majority (58%) of participants were in the precontemplation stage of change, while 14% were in contemplation/preparation, and 28% in action/maintenance.

Public views of the benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet.

OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study was to examine consumers' perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. DESIGN:Mail survey that included questions on perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. SETTING:Victoria, Australia. SUBJECTS:Four hundred and fifteen randomly selected Victorian adults. RESULTS:The main perceived barrier to adoption of a plant-based diet was a lack of information about plant-based diets (42% agreement). Sex, age and education differences were present in over a quarter of the barrier items.

A randomized clinical trial of a standard versus vegetarian diet for weight loss: the impact of treatment preference.

BACKGROUND:With obesity rampant, methods to achieve sustained weight loss remain elusive. OBJECTIVE:To compare the long-term weight-loss efficacy of 2 cal and fat-restricted diets, standard (omnivorous) versus lacto-ovo-vegetarian, and to determine the effect of a chosen diet versus an assigned diet. DESIGN, SUBJECTS: A randomized clinical trial was conducted with 176 adults who were sedentary and overweight (mean body mass index, 34.0 kg/m(2)).

A two-year randomized weight loss trial comparing a vegan diet to a more moderate low-fat diet.

OBJECTIVE:The objective was to assess the effect of a low-fat, vegan diet compared with the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) diet on weight loss maintenance at 1 and 2 years. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:Sixty-four overweight, postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to a vegan or NCEP diet for 14 weeks, and 62 women began the study. The study was done in two replications. Participants in the first replication (N = 28) received no follow-up support after the 14 weeks, and those in the second replication (N = 34) were offered group support meetings for 1 year.

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