Lifestyle Medicine - Evidence Review

Author(s): 

American College of Preventive Medicine

Journal: 

American College of Preventive Medicine

Category: 

Study Design: 

Link to Full Article Free Online: 

Abstract: 

DEFINITIONS OF LIFESTYLE MEDICINE

There doesn’t seem to be a standard definition, but the available definitions are really saying basically the same thing: The use of lifestyle interventions within conventional medicine to lower the risk for a number of lifestyle-related chronic diseases or, if such conditions are already present, to serve as an adjunct to the management plan.
 
Current definitions include:
 
Egger, 2008: The therapeutic use of lifestyle interventions in the management of disease at all levels to help manage the growing number of cases presenting to doctors now with a lifestyle-based cause of disease such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The application of environmental, behavioral, medical and motivational principles to the management of lifestyle related health problems in a clinical setting.
 
ACLM:
The use of lifestyle interventions in the treatment and management of disease.
 
ALMA: The therapeutic use of lifestyle interventions in the management of disease caused primarily by lifestyle.
 
Rippe, 1999: The integration of lifestyle practices into conventional medicine to lower the risk for chronic disease and, if disease is already present, to serve as an adjunct to therapy.
 
Rippe Health: The study and practice of how to help individuals understand that their daily habits and practices have a profound impact on their short and long term health and quality of life.
 
ACPM, Johnson, Barry, 2008: A defined scientific approach to decreasing disease risk and illness burden by utilizing lifestyle interventions such as nutrition, physical activity, stress reduction, smoking cessation, avoidance of alcohol abuse, and rest.
 
Greenstone, 2007: The study and practice of how simple lifestyle measures such as proper diet, proper exercise, and stress reduction are thoughtfully and comprehensively integrated into conventional Western medicine practices; includes promoting health through prevention and therapeutic strategies.