Your Online Source for Plant-Based Research Articles

Welcome to plantbasedresearch.org, an online narrative review of peer-reviewed, scientific research papers and educational resources that are relevant to plant-based nutrition. Links to the abstract are included with every article, and links to the free full articles are included when possible! A narrative review is a collection of research papers supporting a particular theory - this website is by no means an exhaustive directory of all research on nutrition and disease but presents the growing body of evidence supporting the theory that whole food, plant-based diets offer the best chance for avoiding chronic disease, and in some cases, reversing it.

To browse scientific papers a variety of topics visit our "Research Articles by Category" page. Please Join Our Newsletter for updates on new studies! Or, do a site search to find information by keyword. Visit the Participate in Research Studies to join the recruitment list for future studies. Thank you for your interest in plant-based nutrition.

 

Biodiversity conservation: The key is reducing meat consumption

The consumption of animal-sourced food products by humans is one of the most powerful negative forces affecting the conservation of terrestrial ecosystems and biological diversity. Livestock production is the single largest driver of habitat loss, and both livestock and feedstock production are increasing in developing tropical countries where the majority of biological diversity resides. Bushmeat consumption in Africa and southeastern Asia, as well as the high growth-rate of per capita livestock consumption in China are of special concern.

Vegetarian diets and gut microbiota: important shifts in markers of metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

Vegetarian diets have been associated with a lower incidence of several chronic diseases. The benefits of plant-based diets are related mainly to the improvement of metabolic parameters that can indicate risk for such diseases. Some metabolic factors, such as oxidative balance, lipid profile, and glucose homeostasis, can be improved directly by diet, but paradoxically, some characteristics of vegetarian diets may promote a negative scenario that increases the risk of certain chronic diseases.

Effect of a Brown Rice Based Vegan Diet and Conventional Diabetic Diet on Glycemic Control of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A 12-Week Randomized Clinical Trial.

OBJECTIVE:
Several intervention studies have suggested that vegetarian or vegan diets have clinical benefits, particularly in terms of glycemic control, in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, no randomized controlled trial has been conducted in Asians who more commonly depend on plant-based foods, as compared to Western populations. Here, we aimed to compare the effect of a vegan diet and conventional diabetic diet on glycemic control among Korean individuals.

The Vegetarian Advantage: Its Potential for the Health of Our Planet, Our Livestock, and Our Neighbors!

Although vegetarianism has existed for thousands of years, the motivation originally came from philosophical and religious practices and traditions. Beginning about 200 years ago (particularly in the U.K., Germany and soon after the USA) there were prominent advocates for the positive effect of vegetarian diets on physical, and possibly mental health [1].

Mediterranean versus vegetarian diet for cardiovascular disease prevention (the CARDIVEG study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

BACKGROUND:
Nutrition is able to alter the cardiovascular health of the general population. However, the optimal dietary strategy for cardiovascular disease prevention is still far from being defined. Mediterranean and vegetarian diets are those reporting the greatest grade of evidence in the literature, but no experimental studies comparing these two dietary patterns are available.

Is it gluten-free? Relationship between self-reported gluten-free diet adherence and knowledge of gluten content of foods.

OBJECTIVE:
To assess the relationship between self-reported adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) and the ability to determine correctly the appropriateness of particular foods in a GFD.

METHODS:
Persons with celiac disease were recruited through clinics and support groups. Participants completed a questionnaire with items related to GFD information sources, gluten content of 17 common foods (food to avoid, food allowed, and food to question), GFD adherence, and demographic characteristics. Diagnosis was self-reported.

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